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"Roundheads and Ramblings"

plot

The Story Arc

Over on the Camp NaNoWriMo bulletin board, I suggested that those of you having trouble coming up with a story line should spend a little time watching hour-long TV dramas. If you don’t have time for that, think about a favorite children’s book or nursery rhyme. “The Three Little Pigs” serves the purpose well.
 
Here’s a diagram of a story arc to guide you.:

 
Three little pigs are the heroes, and their goal is finding a home that will assure their survival. The villain is the big bad wolf living in the neighborhood because, unfortunately, he likes pork. (Crisis #1)
 
 Pig #1 builds a house (his solution), although his choice of grass as building material is pretty weak. BBW comes along and blows it away. (Crisis #2)
 
Pig #2 builds a better house, using sticks this time (recovery from crisis) but BBW crushes it easily.  (Crisis #3) Tension is now high.
 
Pig #3 steps up and builds his house of bricks (an even better solution to their problem). BBW can’t destroy it from the outside, so he crawls onto the roof to stomp it in. If this house doesn’t survive, our pigs are doomed. (Crisis #4)
 
But BBW falls down the chimney and lands in a pot of water boiling on the fire. (Climax. It’s something of a miracle, but, hey, this is a fairy tale!)
 
Pigs throw a few veggies into the pot and they all feast on wolf stew for dinner before living happily ever after. (denouement)

A Question about a New Book -- or Two

Alright, my faithful readers, it’s spring, or so the weatherman, if not the calendar, says. And spring is a time for new beginnings. I’ve changed the picture on my computer background (flowers, now, instead iof snow}. Next Sunday we switch to Daylight Savings Time. Out in the yard, my herbs are flourishing, and –unfortunately – so are the moles, who seem to have invited a whole new troop of tunnelers to explore my open areas. Trees are budding out, Bradford pear trees are turning the landscape white, and there are sprigs of green grass everywhere. I’m caught up on housework, and the kitchen is stocked with prepared meals and Girl Scout cookies. (What’s not to love?)
 
What hasn’t changed? My writer’s block. My proclivity to research just one more little area before actually putting any words on paper. That same outline for a new book, which seems to be expanding its scope without yet providing a a clear map of how I should go about writing it.  I’ve been fiddling with it since last fall, and if you took a peek at my Scrivener files, you’d find a complete outline just ready to go. Except that it isn’t.  Recently, a couple of friends have asked whether I’m deep into writing yet, and I’ve struggled to answer that. It simply hasn't sprouted yet. 
 
The story bouncing around in my head is awfully complicated. It covers a span of more than twenty years and contains multiple conflicts. There’s a background of the Civil War, of course, but also a family drama, a spy story based on historical fact, an international incident, a rape, fratricide, a kidnapping, a hidden identity, and a backstory concealed in a diary written in code. Its characters include a businessman turned pirate, two paralyzed people (one by stroke, one by accident), an opium-addicted prostitute, an expatriate English woman born into the lesser nobility, a French family of slave-owners, and a couple of visitors from my “Yankee” series. Just putting that list together makes me tired. Sounds fascinating,  you say? Maybe so. But also a web so hopelessly tangled that I haven’t been able to find a loose end to start with.
 
So here’s the new thought bouncing around in my spring-inspired brain this morning. What if I’m not thinking of one book, but two? First would come the early story—all pre-Civil War, all written in first-person—in short, the diary of  the expatriate English woman who is seeing antebellum America and learning about South Carolina’s “peculiar institution” for the first time. The reader would meet most of the characters mentioned above, but in their early years, before their own lives deteriorate. The book would concentrate on the gradual alteration of the main character as her childhood innocence gives way to acceptance of the unthinkable, just as the idealism of the young Republic yields to seemingly unsurmountable differences between North and South.
 
The second book would be set during the early years of the Civil War.  The reader would meet the same characters but in a period during which each of them faces a new challenge. This will be the book that handles the international incident, the piracy and blockade-running, the collapse of “King Cotton,” the mystery surrounding the identity of one of the characters, and the fall-out from earlier scandals that everyone thought were buried forever.
 
What think you?  I’d love to pick the brains of future readers.

 

Rules To Guide My Week

We're home after several hours of driving in blinding rainstorms, one good supper, a night in a so-so hotel, two so-so meetings, more driving rain, a great auction, a superb dinner, a night in a grand hotel (marshmallow beds), and an over-the-top buffet breakfast, featuring oat-nut french toast, sausage gravy and biscuits, bacon and eggs, and topped with fresh blackberries and blueberries. After all that, I feel surprisingly perky and ready to take on the world, particularly since my calendar is practically empty. (Don't expect the same report next Sunday, when I'll be looking ahead to a week of jury duty!)



I'm hoping to make a start this week on the next book, tentatively entitled "Yankee Reconstructed."  As I started thinking about story arcs, I ran across this set of guidelines from a reviewer.  Hope I can keep them firmly in mind for the next five days.

    •     Keep it simple.
    •     Give me one character with a strong point of view.
    •     Show me that character’s attitude about one thing.
    •     Don’t give me blah.
    •     Or ordinary.
    •     Give me edge; risk.
    •     Convince me that the story starts on this day.
    •     Rivet me with a colorful detail. Or two.
    •     Decide why I want to spend a few hundred pages with your main character and give me one reason to engage in the first few pages.
    •     Help me see, taste, smell, touch. Make it sensory.
    •     Avoid using dialogue that is only designed to fill readers in on the background lives of the characters. (Just don’t!) This is dialogue as “info dump.” It’s deadly.
    •     But, mostly, keep it simple.
    •     Really simple.
    •     No, really.

If you'd like to read the whole article from which this was borrowed, you'll find it at: www.writermarkstevens.com

Murderous Rampage, Revisited

This week, I'm going to be preparing a Pinterest Board of suggestions for a Book Club discussion of my Left by the Side of the Road.

As usual, I want to start with an explanation of where my ideas came from. Back in the summer of 2011, I realized that I wasn't doing any novel writing. I didn't have writer's block, as such, because I could whip out a blog post without trouble.  It was the new book that was giving me trouble.  I knew there was something wrong with it, but I couldn't figure out what it was.  

The story of the Gideonites and the Port Royal Experiment had no lack of colorful characters. It's full of fascinating people.  It had all kinds of exotic scenery—swamps, pluff mud, tropical vegetation, glorious sunrises, sandy ocean beaches.  It had drama—a background of America's Civil War, heroic acts of bravery, enormous pain and suffering, and a life-changing struggle for freedom. Why, then, couldn't I make any progress with the book?    The story was simply too big to handle.    

But, oh, how hard it was to cut out all those great tidbits. I had what amounted to half a book already written — some 50,000 words I had created during the past year's National Novel Writing Month.  The chapters were just sitting there, waiting, but I couldn't tell where they were going next.  A couple of weeks later, I started cutting hunks out of those chapters.  The remaining 35,000 words were more coherent, but the direction was still unclear. 

Eventually, of course, I recognized my own errors.  I was writing like a historian.  Now, there's nothing wrong with being a historian.  It's what I am by training and experience.  I want to know exactly what happened, why it happened, who all was involved, when and where it happened (all the usual journalist's questions), as well as what were the underlying causes and results.  All legitimate questions. All important. All calling for more research.  And nothing, NOTHING, that has to do with the nature of a novel.   

The light clicked on first while I was discussing creating a press release.  "Summarize your plot in a single sentence. Then expand it to two sentences.  Make the reader want to know what's going to happen."  I couldn't do it—because I didn't really have a plot.  I was just describing events, hoping that they would magically arrange themselves into an acceptable story. So far, they weren't showing any signs of being able to do that on their own.  So I had 35,000 words, but they weren't the beginning of a novel.  

For a novel, I had to build a plot, one with a clear beginning, a middle, and an end.  It needed a theme, a message, a reason for its existence.  It needed one main character—someone with back story, a character with a likeable personality but a few inner quirks, a character with whom the reader could identify.  That character needed a goal that was important not only to her but to the reader, and she needed an adversary that stood in the way of reaching that goal. The story needed tension, a crisis (or two or three), and a resolution that would be not necessarily happy but reasonable in the light of all that went before.  

The solution was obvious but too drastic to contemplate.  Instead of just trashing the project, I stepped away from it for a while and sought my own guru—someone who could tell me what to do to salvage the idea. I've just finished reading a wonderful book: Story Engineering by Larry Brooks.*  He offers a step by step guide for building the underlying structure of a novel.  As I read, I kept a notepad at hand, where I scratched out ideas of how I could take my historical knowledge and mold it into a workable plot outline.  And suddenly my story did arrange itself. Once I had the main structural elements in place, the people, the places, and the events made sense.  

  The concept of the book? Rejuvenated!  The 35,000 words? I removed over half of them  from the manuscript, but they were not forgotten.  I couldn't bear to throw them out. And eventually they became the basis for my book of short stories, "Left by the Side of the Road."

More tomorrow!

Getting to Know and Love Scapple

What does that word mean?  Think of it as a combination of "scrap" -- "scalpel" (cutting edge) --"scaffold" -- "scramble" -- "scrabble" -- in short a new word to describe that piece of paper on which you doodle until ideas start to flow and make sense. You know the one -- the piece of paper that fills up before you have all your plot elements down?  The one you spilled coffee on, just when you knew what you were going to write about? The one that made perfect sense in the middle of the night but is unreadable in the morning?


Well, you can put those so-called idea-scraps in the nearest trash bin.  Now, if you have a MAC running Snow Leopard or above and Intel, you can use Scapple, a never-ending, infinitely-expandable piece of paper for your computer.  And your random thoughts can end up looking like this:



Scapple is not-really mind-mapping software; it's more like freeform virtual paper. It's proof that your random thoughts really do have a pattern or organization behind them.  You can start anywhere on the sheet and branch out in any direction.  You can include totally unrelated notes, connect ideas in any direction, group items together, move any one note (or any number) from one place to another.  You can apply colors, borders, and shapes if you want them. And when you are all though, you can print out your diagram, or save it in PDF, or drag and drop it into Scrivener.  How cool is that!

I've been using it to map out my main story line and its sub-plots for my next novel.  I've been using clusters of notes for each chapter, and then moving them over to Scrivener for reference.  And when I've completed a draft of a whole chapter, I can drag the new Scrivener note card from the corkboard view back into Scapple, so that it shows up as a completed chapter. Here's a small clip that shows some completed chapters in pink, the next chapters as topics in green, and related plain notes for each chapter.


I was a beta tester for this new application, so I'm  probably biased. However, I'm loving it for the way it keeps me on track.  Apologies to those of you using Windows.  I suspect a form you can use will appear in due course, since you now can get Scrivener (they're made by the same company), but this is so new that it likely will not appear for a while.


In the meantime, if you have the right hardware, this is software you cannot afford to ignore.  It only costs $14.99, and you can get a 30-day free trial if you like .  Order it at http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scapple.php#wrapper-content